COMMITTEE ON ELIMINATION OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION ADOPTS CONCLUSIONS ON CAPE VERDE



Committee on the Elimination
of Racial Discrimination
63rd session
15 August 2003
Afternoon








The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has adopted its final conclusions and recommendations on how Cape Verde implements the provisions of the International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination.

Listed as positive aspects, the Committee noted with appreciation the commitment to human rights manifested by Cape Verde through the ratification of a large number of international instruments as well as the establishment of relevant institutions and the implementation of pertinent programmes in the field of human rights.

The Committee said that with respect to Article 4 of the Convention, it was concerned about the lack of legal provisions to implement the State party’s obligations under Article 4(a), notably the absence of legislative measures punishing acts of racial discrimination and violence.

The Committee recommended, among other things, that the State party take appropriate measures to combat stereotyping of certain groups of immigrants; that the State party monitor closely the phenomenon of trafficking in persons; and that it take all appropriate measures to guarantee the equal enjoyment by women, in particular those of women of foreign origin, of the rights under the International Convention.

Also this afternoon, the Committee started its consideration of the sixteenth periodic report of Norway. It will conclude its review of the situation in Norway on Monday, 18 August, and a press release will be issued on that date.

Concluding Observations and Recommendations on Cape Verde

Concerning the third to twelfth periodic reports of Cape Verde, the Committee expressed its appreciation for the opportunity to resume its dialogue with the State party after a lapse of twenty years. While generally rejecting affirmations of homogeneity, the Committee understood the State party’s assertion that its population was homogenous to mean that, having no autochthonous people, the Cape Verdeans were the product of an intermingling of people from many nations and regions.

Listed as a factor and difficulty in impeding implementation of the International Convention, the Committee took note that Cape Verde was a developing country, which became independent rather recently and suffered from a poor natural resource base, including serious water shortages exacerbated by cycles of long-term drought. It also noted the State party’s geographic spread over several islands, which, combined with other difficulties, posed problems in the provision of services.

Among positive aspects, the Committee noted with appreciation the commitment to human rights manifested by Cape Verde through the ratification of a large number of international instruments as well as the establishment of relevant institutions and the implementation of pertinent programmes in the field of human rights. The creation of a National Human Rights Committee in 2001 was welcomed, as was the establishment of the office of the Ombudsman (Provedor da Justica) and the adoption of a new Penal Code.

The Committee said that with respect to Article 4 of the Convention, it was concerned about the lack of legal provisions to implement the State party’s obligations under Article 4(a), notably the absence of legislative measures punishing acts of racial discrimination and violence.

The Committee recommended, among other things, that the State party take appropriate measures to combat stereotyping of certain groups of immigrants; that the State party monitor closely the phenomenon of trafficking in persons; and that it take all appropriate measures to guarantee the equal enjoyment by women, in particular those of women of foreign origin, of the rights under the International Convention. The Committee also recommended that the State party include in its next periodic report statistical information on prosecutions launched and penalties imposed in cases of offenses which related to racial discrimination, and ensured that appropriate provisions were available in national legislation, and that the public be informed about all legal remedies in the field of racial discrimination. The Committee also encouraged the State party to consult with organizations of civil society working in the field of combating racial discrimination during the preparation of the next periodic reports.



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